Repentance or Ruin

ILLINOIS BAPTIST COLLEGE

 

REPENTANCE OR RUIN

Amos 1:1-9:15

Key Verses: 4:12-13, 5:24

INTRO:

  1. The prophet–Some have concluded that Amos was a wealthy rancher and orchard owner. Others have concluded he was a subsistence laborer, liv-ing on the edge of poverty.  Others have concluded that Amos was highly edu-cated and a polished  literary giant.  Others that he was an uncultured wilder-        ness dweller who could not read or write.  His name means “burden” or “burden bearer.”
  2. The times–Amos lived in times of material prosperity. The long reigns of Uzziah (783-742 BC) in Judah and of Jeroboam II (786-746 BC)  in  Israel  (1:1)  had brought  stability, prosperity and expansion to the two kingdoms.  The Southern Kingdom  had  subdued  the  Philistines  to the west, the    Ammonites to the east and the Arab states to the south.   Uzziah’s political influence was felt as far as Egypt (2 Chron. 26:1-15).
  3. The date–762 BC– Amos was  the  first of four eighth-century B.C. writing      prophets in Israel.  The other three were Hosea (c 750 BC), Isaiah (c 740 BC) and Micah (c 735 BC).  Amos & Hosea prophesied in Israel, while Isaiah and Micah ministered in  Judah.
  4. The message-Amos was a man who heard the Word of the Lord and took it seriously, he showed that he took it seriously, by obeying God.  Even though what God told him to do was very unusual and terribly difficult, he did it.  He went             from his native village, Tekoa, in Judah, and traveled all  the way to Israel.  There he began to tell the people of  Israel what God wanted them to know–a message they didn’t want to hear!   Through him, God  says  something  very  significant:  ‘People of Israel, you’ve had a boundless opportunity to  hear the Word of God.  You’ve had untold opportunities, but  you have relentlessly and consistently disobeyed the Word  of God. Therefore,’ God says, ‘I am going to send famine among you.  Not a famine of bread.  Not a famine of bread.   Not a famine of water.  No, something much worse is coming: famine of hearing the Word of the Lord.’  The time will come you will no longer  be in tune  with what God  has to  say.”
  5. Declaration (Chaps. 1-2)–“Thus says the Lord”
  6. Judgment on Sins against Conscience (1:3-2:3).

1). Judgment on Damascus (1:3-5).

  1.             The Source of the message “Thus says the Lord”
  2. The subject of the message “For three transgressions of Damascus, and for four.”
  3. The substance of the message “because…” (Cruelty)
  4.           The sentence of the message (1:4-5). “I will send a fire,” “I will break the gate,” &  “I will cut off…”
  5.           The significance of the message (v. 5e) “Says the Lord”

 

2). Judgment on Philistia (1:6-8).

  1.  The Source of the message “Thus says the Lord”
  2. The subject of the message “For three transgressions of Gaza, and for four.”
  1. The substance of the message “because…” (The slave trade)
  2.         The sentence of the message (1:7-8).

a). “I will send a fire…”  (war to devour).

b). “I will cut off…” (the respective rulers).

c). “I will turn My hand…” (with power so Ekron will feel the full strength of God”).

3.  The significance of the message “Says the Lord God”

 

3). Judgment on Tyre (1:9-10).

  1. The Source of the message “Thus says the Lord”
  2. The subject of the message “For three transgressions of Tyre, and for four.”
  3. The substance of the message “because…” (slave trade)
  4.               The sentence of the message “I will send a fire…”

4). Judgment on Edom (1:11-12).

  1.          The Source of the message “Thus says the Lord”
  2.      The subject of the message “For three transgressions of Edom, and for four.”
  1.   The substance of the message “because…”  (hatred and contempt)
  1.    The sentence of the message “I will send a fire…”

5). Judgment on Ammon (1:13-15).

  1. The Source of the message “Thus says the Lord”
  2. The subject of the message “For three transgressions of Ammon, and for four.”
  3. The substance of the message “because…” (brutal treatment of pregnant women)
  4.   The sentence of the message (1:13-15).

a).  Direct “I will kindle a fire…”

b).  Demolition “It shall devour its palaces.”

c).  Departure “Their king shall go into captivity.”

The significance of the message “Says the Lord”

 

6). Judgment on Moab (2:1-3).

  1. The Source of the message “Thus says the Lord”
  2. The subject of the message “For three transgressions of Moab, and for four.”
  1. The substance of the message “because…”  (burned the bones of Edom’s king into lime)
  1.    The sentence of the message (2:2-3).

a). Effectiveness “I will send a fire…”

b). Elimination “I will cut off…” (the ruler).

c). Extermination “I will slay…”

The significance of the message “Says the Lord”

 

  1. Judgment on Sins against the Law–Judah (2:4-5).

1). The Source of the message “Thus says the Lord”

2). The subject of the message “For three transgressions of  Judah, and for four.”

3). The substance of the message “because…”   (have not   kept the law of God and their idol worship)

4). The sentence of the message “I will send a fire…”

  1. Judgment on Sins against Love–Israel (2:6-16).

1). The Source of the message “Thus says the Lord”

2). The subject of the message “For three transgressions of Israel, and for four.”

3). The substance of the message “because…”

  1.    Injustice (2:6-7a).
  2.    Immorality (2:7b-8).
  3.   Ingratitude (2:9-12).

4). The sentence of the message  (2:13-16).

  1. Means one is a burden to God  “I am weighed down…”(KJV)
  2. Means one is broken by God “I will crush you…” (NIV)

5). The significance of the message “Says the Lord”

  1. Proclamation (3-6)–“Now hear this Word”
  2. Proclamation I–Privileges  Despised  (relates  to  the present) (3:1-15).

1). Privilege brings responsibility (3:1-2).  Deut. 32:12.

  1.    The summons to attention (3:1).
  2.    The statement of accountability (3:2).

2). Penalty follows irresponsibility (3:3-8).

3). Punishment then is God’s responsibility (3:9-15).

  1.      Declaration (3:9-10).
  2.     Defenseless (3:11-12).
  3. Proclamation II–Perversity Described (relates to the past)    (4:1-13).

1). Acknowledgement(4:1-3) “The whole society of Israel is corrupt.”

  1.    Designation of the offenders (4:1a).
  2.    Description of their offenses (4:1b).
  3.    Denunciation of the offenders (4:2-3).

2). Announcement (4:4-5).  “Come and sin some more.” (biting sarcasm).

  1.   Sarcastic manifestation (4:4a)
  2.   Sacrificial multiplication (4:4b-5a)
  3.   Superficial motivation (4:5b)

 

3). Accusation (4:6-11) “Still you will not return to Me.”

  1. Challenge of famine (4:6).
  2. Consideration of drought (4:7-8).
  3. Courses of blight & devastation (4:9).
  4. Chastisement of catastrophes (4:10-11).

4). Alarm (4:12-13) “It is too late now.”

  1. Pronouncement is clear (4:12a)  “Thus will I do.”
  2. Preparation is a concern (4:12b)  “Prepare.”
  3. Power for punishment is certain (4:13)  “Look Who you are dealing with.”
  4. Proclamation III–Punishment  Declared  (relates   the   prospect)

(5:1-6:14).  “Thus says the Lord,” vv. 3, 4, 16.

1). The “Woe” of an Inescapable Penalty (5:1-27). v. 18.

  1.              The announcement of ruin (death) (5:1-3).

a). The dirge (5:1)

b). The desertion (5:2)

c). The decimation (5:3)

  1.                 The appeal to repentance (5:4-15). vv. 4, 6, 14.

1). Seek Me in a proper way (5:4-5).  “Turn to Me in trust and confidence.”

2). Seek Me in a practical way (5:6-13).  “Do what is right.”

3). Seek Me in a personal way (5:14-15).

  1.                    The agony of rejection (5:16-20).

a). The mourning (5:16) “wailing.”

b). The moment (5:17) “For I will pass through you.”

c). The manifestation (5:18) “the day of the Lord”

d). The manner (5:19) “as though.”

e). The method (5:20) “darkness.”

  1.                 The absence of righteousness (5:21-27).

a). The refusal (5:21).

b). The regard (5:22).

c). The rejection (5:23).

d). The requirement (5:24).

e). The rationale (5:25-27).

  1.       The inquiry (25).
  2.      The idolatry (5:26).

iii. The exile (5:27).

2). The “Woe” of Irresponsible Prosperity (6:1-6).

  1. A false sense of security (6:1-2).
  2.   a false sense of values (6:3-6).

3). The “Woe” of Inevitable Punishment (6:7-14).

  1. The declaration of coming punishment (6:7).
  2. The denunciation of confident plans (6:8-10).
  3. The devastation of overconfident people (6:11-14).

a). The ruin (6:11).

b). The reasoning (6:12).

c). The rejoicing (6:13).

d). The reality (6:14).

 

III. Revelation (7:1-9:10)–“Then the Lord showed me.”

  1. Vision I–Vision  of  the  Swarming  Locusts  (7:1-3) .   Forgiveness.

1). The initiation of predicament (7:1a)  “Thus the Lord  God showed me.”

2). The instrument of punishment (7:1b).

3). The intercession of the prophet (7:2)  “Please pardon.”

4). The indication of the divine purpose (7:3).

2 . Vision II–Vision of The Consuming Fire (7:4-6).  Familiarity.

1). The indication of predicament (7:4a) “Thus the Lord God  showed me.”

2). The instrument of punishment (7:4b).

3). The intercession of the prophet (7:5)  “Please stop.”

4). The indication of the divine purpose (7:6).

  1. Vision III–Vision of The Hanging Plumb line (7:7-9). Failure.

1). The indication of predicament (7:7a) “Thus He showed                me.”

2). The indicator of the divine purpose  “plumb line.”

3). The intention of punishment (7:8-9a).

4). The instrument of punishment (7:9b) “the sword.”

  1. Tyranny of False Religion (7:10-17).

1). Complaint against the prophet (7:10-13).

  1.     Charge (7:10-11).
  2.     Challenge (7:12-13).

2). Condemnation from the prophet (7:14-17).

  1.   A commission with an authority for message (7:14-            15).
  2.   A courage due to a message of authority (7:16-17).
  3. Vision IV–Vision of Over Ripe Summer Fruit (8:1-14).

1). The Manifestation (8:1-3).

  1.   The indication of predicament (8:1a) “Thus the Lord God showed me.”
  2.   The illustration of divine purpose (8:1b)   “a basket of summer fruit.”
  3.   The interpretation of proclamation (8:2b-3).  “This is the end!

 

2). The Mourning (8:4-10).

  1. Insatiable greed (8:4-6).
  2. Indefensible arrogance (8:7-8).
  3. Intense grief (8:9-10).

3). The Misfortune (8:11-14).

  1. A famine of hearing the Words of the Lord (8:11).
  2. A futile search for the Word of the Lord (8:12).
  3. A fainting from thirst for the Word of the Lord (8:13).
  4. A failure of false religion (8:14).
  5. Vision V–Vision of the False Altar (9:1-10).

1). Divine Appearance (9:1a).

2). Divine announcement (9:1b-4).

3). Divine authority (9:5-6).

4). Divine assignment (9:7-10).

  1.     Reminder (9:7).
  2.    Remnant (9:8).
  3.    Representation (9:9).
  4.     Rebellion (9:10).

 

  1. Expectation–“I will raise up” (9:11-15).
  2. Statement of hope (vv. 11-12).
  3. Sustenance that is abundant (v. 13).
  4. Shelter (v. 14a).
  5. Satisfaction (v. 14b).
  6. Security (v. 15).

 

CONCLUSION:

  1. Kenneth Matthews says: “This would happen only when God established the eternal reign of David’s greater Son.   The rule of the house of David in the days of ancient Israel  as a foregleam of the eternal, universal dominion of God in Christ.”

 

  1. Kenneth Matthews also says: “This is the challenge that  the Book  of Amos  presents us today.  Will we adhere to Amos’ warning of judgment by turning from our sinful ways?    Will we join the ‘remnant of Joseph’ and seek the shelter of the ‘booth of David’ by trusting in Jesus Christ?”

 

Prepared by:

Gerald R. Steffy

6206 N. Hamilton Road

                                                                                Peoria, IL 61614               

 

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